Channeling Cassadaga: Lunchtime in the “Psychic Capital of the World”

When I heard that the oldest continuously active community of practicing Spiritualists was along the route of my road trip through the American South East, I of course had to plan to stop and visit. Cassadaga, Florida, is a tiny community off Highway 4, about an hour north of Orlando. Founded during the peak ofContinue reading “Channeling Cassadaga: Lunchtime in the “Psychic Capital of the World””

Three Low Impact Eco Adventures into the American South East

In my last post, I described some of my personally observed critiques related to the global Eco-Tourism industry. As much as I love travel, I also understand the contradictions between experience and knowledge; and am deeply aware of the privilege associated with the capacity to cross oceans and borders freely, where I enter other landsContinue reading “Three Low Impact Eco Adventures into the American South East”

Three Problems of Eco Tourism: A Barefoot Review

A steely sky cracked to release faint rays of sunlight, but the low swirling clouds and the peaks of the Dinarides consumed most of the warmth. It was only 9am. I was already chilled after my four kilometer walk in the light rain from the hostel to the travel agency to join nearly 100 otherContinue reading “Three Problems of Eco Tourism: A Barefoot Review”

Finding Center: Three Cincinnati Labyrinths to Explore along an Inward Journey

Winter was wearing thin on us, and although it had not been a savage season in southwest Ohio, time was stretching long and thin while the city of Cincinnati marched along with the pandemic drum beat. After a tiresome election cycle and a disengaged holiday season, January brought an attempted coup and heavy gray cloudsContinue reading “Finding Center: Three Cincinnati Labyrinths to Explore along an Inward Journey”

Three Important Lessons Learned through the Adventure of Randonauting

Randonauting is the word that defines travel to an “anomolous experience” using the new app called Randonautica. Randonautica describes itself as “the world’s first quantum random adventure game.” It challenges its players to clear their minds, focus their breathe on an intention, and then generate coordinates on a map that aligns with the experience theyContinue reading “Three Important Lessons Learned through the Adventure of Randonauting”

Three Works of Travel Writing to Ignite Your Imagination (while we patiently wait for the pandemic to run its course)

Bread and Ashes British writer and adventurer Tony Anderson transports his readers through the remote mountain villages of the nearly impenetrable Caucasus Mountains. The families he encounters are rugged survivors of the war in Abkhazia and Ossetia, and of a long history of tribal and civil war. At the time of his journey in 1998,Continue reading “Three Works of Travel Writing to Ignite Your Imagination (while we patiently wait for the pandemic to run its course)”

Indigenous Ohio: Relics of Colonization and a Neglected History

Yesterday was Indigenous People’s Day in the United States. Indigenous People’s Day started in Berkeley, California, in 1992, 500 years after Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas. It is a counter-celebration of Columbus Day, the US Federal holiday also on October 12, which serves only to sanitize the violent history of colonization across North andContinue reading “Indigenous Ohio: Relics of Colonization and a Neglected History”

Dreaming the Future of Travel into Existence from an Unlikely Campground in Ohio

Recently, I was in that inspirational and exhilarating space of planning for a week away from the responsibilities and tedium of daily life. Some may call this a vacation, but for me, these times of freedom and creativity are more akin to a pilgrimage into an unfamiliar space, over-flowing with magic and self-discovery. In theContinue reading “Dreaming the Future of Travel into Existence from an Unlikely Campground in Ohio”

Money, Travel, and American Scarcity: Conversations and Perspectives from Central Europe

Perhaps the three most divisive topics of conversation in the Western world are money, religion, and politics. They are like a dirty triad. At your next (post pandemic) dinner party, start a discussion about money, religion, and politics first; and then slowly merge into the issues of sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll, and observeContinue reading “Money, Travel, and American Scarcity: Conversations and Perspectives from Central Europe”